Tish Bouvier

hashtag #mywritinglife

Last weekend I so focused on my writing process, which included setting up my author’s platform. And I didn’t take time to do something that brings me pleasure such as reading. I got caught up again trying to build ROME in a day. My mind was so stressed out I couldn’t just SIT and FOCUS on the beautiful pages of someone else’s story.

Then magic happened…

A suggestion took root in my stressed out mind to read something different from the genre I’m writing. And then I started thinking to myself, well dang, since I’m writing BoO’s story (BoO is my ghost that lives in a toaster), why not read other children’s book to get inspired? Truth is, I have never written a children’s story, and my mind doesn’t serve me well to reflect on my childhood memories. But one magical morning after attending my weekend WWJ’s Bootcamp *Writing Warriors For Jesus, I made BoO, my weekend writing project. I also read as many children’s books as I can over the weekend. And that was the best decisions I’ve made in the last three months. There’s nothing like a children’s book to take your stress away. 

Books N’Review

I choose three books out of the 20 children’s books I read this past weekend, to review. I will share my thoughts, hoping it will encourage you to take a mental break, relax your mind, and give yourself permission to be an adult child. Now, allow your imagination to travel into the pages of wonderment.

THE KID DRANK THE COFFEE by M.J. Devaney

The Kid Drank The Coffee, was my favorite weekend read😁. The message was right on target for both kids and parents. Especially if you have that ONE KID who likes to take a sip of your coffee when you’re not looking. I had three of them, so I can relate.

The story took you on a journey of a kid’s first sip of coffee. One sip. Two sips until the coffee mug is empty! And coffee ignite SUPER POWERS! But as an adult we know how coffee works with our bodies — taking us on a caffeinated high, and then we bottom out.

This is M.J. Devaney first children’s book, and he presented it with engaging yet, simple illustration, and a story most parents can relate to their first experience with coffee.

If Mom Became An Octopus by C.M.Healy

I saw pieces of myself as mom in this book, and wondered what did my kids think of me when I would complain about having too much to do and not enough arms to do it, because my kids were too lazy to help. If my Mom Became An Octopus, will take you through a young child’s vivid imagination.

The lazy child envisioned his mom changing into some of nature’s wildest animals. Eventually, after seeing his mom morphing from one animal to the next, things got a little too weird, especially when in public. Finally, the child realized the things moms do to make life a littler easier for their kids.

This book offers a message of appreciation, and allows parents to talk with their children about chores, and helping around the house to make life a little easier for each other.

The Scariest Book In The Entire World (*Book 2 from the series Entire Whole Books) by Joey Acker

This book had me laughing out loud, had to ask me what was I reading. I thought they wrote this book just of me to use as therapy. Someone who seeks to escape from reality, and burst into a world of unexpected laughter. That’s exactly what I got from reading, The Scariest Book In The World Entire World.

Initially, I reminded myself that I like nothing scary, but this is a children’s book so it can’t be that scary. It wasn’t. Joey Acker took elements of a child mind, things an adult you would find creepy, such as the dark and a clown. I don’t like the dark, and I always thought a clown was too creepy to be funny. But the one in this story brought me an unanticipated burst of laughter, with a surprised ending that confirms my adult fear of clowns. However, I laughed throughout this entire book. 

The author wrote this book in a minimalist format, with simple drawings that that would give the illusion anyone could pick up a pencil and draw the characters. Kids like simplicity, adults makes things complicated, so this book hit its target audience. Parents just need to pick it up and read it to their kids in their most dramatic voices. 

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